Developmental growth lies at the heart of Decurion’s approach to business. One of our axioms is that individuals and communities naturally develop. One of our values is learning, a belief in providing an opportunity and environment for individuals to develop, grow, and contribute. And our purpose, to provide places for people to flourish, includes creating conditions for people to develop more fully into themselves. So what do we know about developmental growth?

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In my last post, I mentioned something called “the quadrants.”  This is a reference to a model developed by Ken Wilber, a model we have found useful in our approach to business.  (In a recent survey, 86% of our members reported that “when doing my job, I take into account all four quadrants.”)

Wilber’s quadrants capture a simple but powerful idea.  It is that anything we might want to think about, talk about, or act upon can be viewed as having an interior and an exterior (or an inner and outer aspect) and as being singular or plural.  Combining these two dimensions gives four possibilities:  inner/individual (Upper-Left Quadrant), outer/individual (Upper-Right Quadrant), inner/collective (Lower-Left Quadrant), and outer/collective (Lower-Right Quadrant).

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In my last blog post, I shared a document we created about ten years ago, “Decurion’s Operating Philosophy.”  Over the decade since we first shared that document with our members (employees) and prospective members, we have made several efforts to refine and clarify the way we explain our approach to business.  In this post, I present one of our earlier efforts, “A Note on Decurion’s Operating Philosophy.”

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Ten years ago, more than a decade after we had identified Decurion’s purpose, we attempted to capture in a document our approach to business.  We wrote it mainly for our members (the term we later introduced for employees).  And then we used it in our recruiting efforts.  While imperfect, it did help people here better understand what we were up to, and it gave people thinking about joining us an idea of what they could expect to encounter.  Other than adding an axiom (see below), we have not found it necessary to alter the document.  It remains an accurate description of why we are in business and how we approach it.  So while we think Robert Kegan and his colleagues did a great job of describing Decurion in their Harvard Business Review article “Making Business Personal,” I want to share this document as our best take on ourselves.  We refer to it as “Decurion’s Operating Philosophy”:

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